Category Archives: News

Dorset Badger Cull October 2016 Update – West Dorset Cull Continues…

Standard

DBBW can now confirm that the North Dorset badger cull has finished…

…BUT but we still need help in the West Dorset cull zones!

We thank all our patrollers for their help in the North zone this year and of course those in the West who will be carrying on as usual.

Please help us in West Dorset now if you can!

Please email us for up to date meeting info and to let us know you are coming on dorsetbbw@gmail.com or dorsetbadgerpatrol@gmail.com, or you can also contact our control number on 07557 229273.

[FURTHER UPDATE] PLEASE NOTE: Despite what some people have been posting on Facebook etc it seems the West Dorset badger cull will NOT be ending on Monday 17th October, so we will inform you as soon as we have official confirmation when it does end. Sorry it’s not good news… but one way of looking at it, is that it may mean the cullers have not reached their target!

Advertisements

Dorset Badger Cull Autumn 2016 – October Update

Standard

We still need help on Badger Patrols in both West and North Dorset zones for the time being… the six week rule does not apply!

Please email us for up to date meeting info and to let us know you are coming on dorsetbbw@gmail.com or dorsetbadgerpatrol@gmail.com, or you can also contact our control number on 07557 229273 and they will take your details to pass onto someone in the area that you can help out in!

We and the badgers thank you for your continuing support!

Dorset Badger Cull Autumn 2016 – Quick Update

Standard

It is now confirmed that Natural England have issued the licences for culling badgers in many areas as we expected.

Please if you can help on patrols in West Dorset which is a new zone and will be hit hard, and North Dorset also for the 2nd year.

More detailed information will follow later…

PLEASE NOTE:
As from tonight, meetings in Bridport Car Park will ONLY be by prior arrangement with DBBW. People should therefore contact us first, otherwise please do not just turn up at the previous meeting point. You can of course go to the Dorchester or Shaftesbury meeting points every night instead (look on the top right of this page!).

Meetings in other places and at other times can also be arranged.

[UPDATE] PLEASE NOTE: Meetings are 7:30-8pm EVERY NIGHT (7 days a week) until Sunday 11th September 2016 only. As of Monday 12th September 2016 meetings will be earlier at 7pm-7:30pm due to the evenings getting darker earlier.

Also the police have mentioned for us to ask people if you open a farm gate to please make sure you close it again and if you have dogs with you please make sure they are under control around livestock.

NEW PETITION AGAINST THE BADGER CULLS
Please also sign this latest petition launched by TV’s Wildlife Expert Simon King OBE:
“End the badger cull instead of expanding to new areas”
https://petition.parliament.uk/signatures/25316292/verify?token=ymhNqZcW8MYTVR5GGcwN

Thank you for your support!

Dorset Badger Cull Autumn 2016 Officially Confirmed

Standard

14079801_1082701521821799_2592883004782379309_n

The BBC have announced this morning that the culls will be starting early September, we think it will be earlier, maybe this Bank Holiday Monday!

West Dorset is a new zone so we will have the two zones this year, as North Dorset will be culled for the second time.

If you are able to help in the zones please contact us on 07557 229273, if you are not able to help walking on patrols, there may be other ways you could still help!

Starting August 29th 2016 (Bank Holiday Monday) the Dorset Badger Patrols are meeting at 7:30-8pm EVERY NIGHT while the cull lasts, at the following meeting points:

[UPDATE] PLEASE NOTE: Meetings are 7:30-8pm EVERY NIGHT (7 days a week) until Sunday 11th September 2016 only. As of Monday 12th September 2016 meetings will be earlier at 7pm-7:30pm due to the evenings getting darker earlier.

Shaftesbury – Tesco’s car park, SP7 8PF
Dorchester – Tesco’s car park, DT1 2RY
Bridport – ONLY by prior arrangement with DBBW so please do not just turn up, contact us first!

(7 days a week) until Sunday 11th September 2016.
N.B. As of Monday 12th September 2016 meetings will be earlier at 7pm-7:30pm (due to the evenings getting darker earlier)

We are also raising funds for fuel to help our patrollers – if you wish to donate please go to https://dorsetbandb.org/donate

The government have again decided to ignore all the scientists and experts that have stated that culling is not the way to stop Bovine TB, and in fact could make the problem even worse (as badgers flee cull zones) so we will be showing our protest in a peaceful manner again.

If we are close to cull operators they cannot shoot – so our presence is important, and we can save lives!

We thank you all for your support.
Here we go again…

See also the Mail Online article today: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/wires/pa/article-3754280/Badger-cull-tackle-bovine-TB-extended.html

Make sure you check out all our latest blog posts to be fully updated and for more information – go to our Home page here – and double check the latest Badger Patrol Meeting info on the top right of this site!

Dorset Badgers Need You!

Standard

dorset badger patrols 2016

An appeal to anyone within easy reach of Dorset and who hasn’t already been in touch with DBBW or DBP, offering to help during the cull:

The slaughter is almost upon us. The badgers desperately need us, whether you’ve been out on patrol in previous years or are a complete newcomer.

PATROLS

You can patrol at any time during the day or night. There will be a 24-hour Control Number for you to ring to report anything you see. There will also be a police liaison team number if needed.

You won’t be asked to take on more than you can manage.

If you want to walk regularly during day, we can give you maps of a particular area/zone convenient for you.

Night patrols go out in small groups. Those run by Dorset Badger Patrol will keep to legal rights of way.

[UPDATE] Starting August 29th 2016 (Bank Holiday Monday) the Dorset Badger Patrols are meeting at 7:30-8pm EVERY NIGHT while the cull lasts, at the following meeting points:

[FURTHER UPDATE] PLEASE NOTE: Meetings are 7:30-8pm EVERY NIGHT (7 days a week) until Sunday 11th September 2016 only. As of Monday 12th September 2016 meetings will be earlier at 7pm-7:30pm due to the evenings getting darker earlier.

Shaftesbury – Tesco’s car park, SP7 8PF
Dorchester – Tesco’s car park, DT1 2RY
Bridport – ONLY by prior arrangement with DBBW so please do not just turn up, contact us first!

Police liaison will be attending.

Equipment: Hi-viz jackets and waistcoats are a must, day or night. Good torch plus spare batteries. Mobile phone and camera. Map-reading/navigation skills would be useful but not essential.

ACCOMMODATION

Coming from further afield? If you don’t want to camp but would like accommodation for a few nights, please email us.

If you live in north or west Dorset and can offer a spare bed or two to fellow patrollers or parking for a camper van, please email us.

Got a spare bed? Then help us give all people coming to Dorset to protect our badgers a warm welcome!

Email dorsetbbw@gmail.com or dorsetbadgerpatrol@gmail.com

Make sure you check out all our latest blog posts to be fully updated and for more information – go to our Home page here – and double check the latest Badger Patrol Meeting info on the top right of this site!

Dorset Badger Cull Update – Summer 2016

Standard

13775894_1060215764070375_8092487320132278098_n

It’s been a while since our last blog post but rest assured we have been extremely busy working behind the scenes preparing for the dreadful day the badger cull may resume, which is now expected to be very soon…

Join the Dorset Badger Patrol

We need lots more volunteers to join our group of peaceful protesters walking public byways during the badger culls.

Follow DBP on Facebook or on Twitter for more updates and contact us via our contact page or via DBVP.

Donations needed for fuel and equipment

You can help us by donating towards fuel and equipment which will be desperately needed during the upcoming badger cull – click here to donate.

Keep up to date on our social media pages

Please follow DBBW on Facebook or on Twitter for lots more updates.

Make sure you also check out all our latest blog posts to be fully updated and for more information – go to our Home page here – and double check the latest Badger Patrol Meeting info on the top right of this site!

Here is just a selection of recent news articles we think are of particular interest as they remind us why a badger cull may continue to make the problem of TB in cattle worse, not better:

The Guardian: Badger Cull Linked to Rise in Bovine TB Cases
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/feb/19/badger-cull-linked-to-rise-in-bovine-tb-cases?CMP=share_btn_tw

The Guardian: Bovine TB Not Passed on Through Direct Contact With Badgers
https://www.theguardian.com/environment/2016/aug/05/bovine-tb-not-passed-on-through-direct-contact-with-badgers-research-shows?CMP=share_btn_tw?

The Ecologist: Why Badgers Are Always at the Head of the Blame Queue
http://www.theecologist.org/blogs_and_comments/commentators/2987993/why_are_badgers_always_at_the_head_of_the_blame_queue.html

An Unlikely Story: the Radio Times sells badger culling

Standard

The latest issue of the Radio Times must be making anti-badger culling people spitting mad.  An article titled An Unlikely Star by Terry Payne, is advertising a programme, Land of Hope and Glory, being broadcast by BBC2 on Friday 4 March at 9 pm.

As Mark Jones (veterinarian and policy manager, Born Free Foundation) comments:

“The article paints a wholly inaccurate and biased picture of the situation facing cattle farmers affected by bovine tuberculosis.”

Jane Treays whose film it is has, on her own admission, set out to make a very partisan case for culling badgers. As quoted by Payne, she says:

“There is a massacre of our dairy herds going on and it is not being covered”.

The ‘massacre’ is the number of cattle being slaughtered because of bovine TB – around 30,000 a year (not all of which have bTB). What is never mentioned is the greater ‘massacre’ of cattle slaughtered for other reasons. For example, in 2008 75,000 were slaughtered because they were infertile.

Nor can Treays claim that the issue of bTB in cattle is not being covered. It constantly appears in the Western Region media (and elsewhere), in farming programmes on radio and TV and papers devoted to farming. And far more space is granted to the NFU and farmers wanting to cull badgers than is given to those people trying to argue on scientific grounds that badger culls won’t help the farmers or their cattle.

The ‘unlikely star’ of Treays’ film is Somerset farmer Maurice Durbin who has had TB on his farm since 2010. Faced with that information, Jan Bayley of the Animal Welfare Group commented:

“To have continuous incidents suggests that TB is endemic in his herd.”

One wonders whether the vets and Defra inspectors constantly visiting his farm had ever suggested as much.   Mark Jones agrees:

“Bovine TB is a significant problem for our cattle industry. This problem has been exacerbated in recent years because of cattle farming and trading practices which are not focussed on disease control, and by successive governments which took their eye off the ball, particularly during the BSE and FMD crises. So much so, that in some parts of the west and south west the disease has effectively become endemic.”

In fact, the strong possibility of endemic bTB in herds is something that should be taken very seriously, studied and acted upon. Durbin has lost a third of his 320-strong pedigree Guernsey herd to the disease which, so the article says, is ‘often transmitted in the urine of badgers’. And note, not badgers possibly infected with bTB, just badgers. There are theories as to how transmission between cattle and badgers takes place, but nothing is proven.

Mark Jones adds:

“Many wild animals can contract bovine TB, and badgers can certainly carry the infection. But shooting large numbers of mostly healthy badgers will not help cattle farmers tackle a problem their industry has created.

“The fundamental difficulty with bovine TB is that the primary test used to determine whether cattle are infected only detects between 50-80% of the infected animals, leaving anything from one-in-five to one-in-two (that is anything between 20 and 50 per cent) of infected animals in the herd to continue spreading the infection. With ever larger herds this creates a huge problem, and is the reason so many herds suffer multiple breakdowns.”

Durbin’s farm has been ‘effectively closed for all this time’.   Of course it has. Mark Jones continues:

“The testing limitations mean that, in order to control the spread of disease, very strict testing regimes must be introduced and adhered to, movement restrictions on known infected herds and farm biosecurity measures must be rigorous, and enforced risk-based trading is essential to ensure clean herds do not become infected from herds, which though declared ‘disease free’ actually still harbour infection.

“These are the measures which enabled bovine TB to be successfully brought under control back in the late 1950s and 1960s during the so-called ‘area eradication strategy’. Under that scheme, the number of cattle slaughtered because of bovine TB was reduced from a peak of 25,000 in 1959, to less than 10% of that figure a decade later. It’s worth noting we didn’t even know badgers could be infected with bovine TB until 1971.”

Treays says:

“We hear lots about the inhumanity of culling badgers, but nothing about the 30,000 cattle that are being shot each year because of TB.”

Being shot? Does Treays know anything about the slaughter of cattle in abattoirs?   She claims that she ‘loves’ badgers and that it was right that they had become a protected species but:

“… now it is out of balance. The job of protecting them is done.”

Seeing that badgers are still dug out of their setts for badger baiting, most would disagree with that. She continues:

“No one is speaking up for the dairy industry… We have got to have a more reasoned debate.”

The NFU is constantly bleating about the state of the dairy industry, the price of milk, the threat of bTB and the necessity of culling badgers. But it refuses absolutely to have a reasoned debate with the scientists.

Yet as Mark Jones says:

“Playing the ‘badger blame game’ will not solve the bovine TB problem for farmers. The ‘massacre’ of cattle must of course be tackled, but not by massacring badgers, which won’t help struggling farmers and may well make things considerably worse.”

Payne’s article ends:

A tearful farmer Durbin is clear where the blame lies. “It’s the bloody do-gooders. They interfere with everything we do.”

By ‘do-gooders’ does he means scientists, vets and wildlife experts?

Lesley Docksey © 26/02/16